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AUSSIES VIEW THEIR CAR AS THE SECOND-HARDEST THING TO LIVE WITHOUT AFTER THEIR PARTNER

As we prepare to throw open the gates to Australia’s biggest car festival, SUMMERNATS, research commissioned by eBay Australia confirms Aussies are car-obsessed, viewing their car as the second-hardest thing to live without (39%), following their partner (70%) and valuing it above pets (28%),  holidays (15%), coffee (14%), takeaway food (10%) and social media (7%).


With over half of Aussies (51%) considering themselves motoring enthusiasts who are passionate about sports cars, 4WDs, muscle cars and more, the survey also found approximately one in five (18%) also have a personal nickname for their ride, with the most popular title being ‘Betty’, alongside ‘Bertha’ and ‘Baby’. Surprisingly, over one in ten (12%) of those surveyed admit to washing their cars as or more frequently than they do their hair.



According to the research, the nation’s love of cars is seeing as many as 2.8 million Aussies (11%) consider themselves car collectors, with the average collection consisting of three cars valued at approximately $120,000. While most are driven to collecting as a result of their deep appreciation for a particular style of car (52%), one in five (20%) reported they collect cars with a financial objective anticipating that the value of their collection will appreciate over time. This suggests that this popular hobby is a potential way for Aussies to bring in additional funds, during the cost of living pinch.


Despite the passion fuelling collecting habits, the survey found 71 per cent of car collectors own a car they no longer use and would consider selling. According to the survey, this indicates that the potential estimated total value of unused cars Aussies would be willing to sell is up to $34.7 billion AUD.


While collecting is a popular pastime for Aussies, according to eBay’s research, undertaking project car builds is even more loved, with almost one in five Australians (17%) participating in the hobby and spending an average of $30,000 on the work last year.


As the undisputed home of horsepower, car festival SUMMERNATS is set to draw thousands of dedicated Aussie muscle car fans to Canberra to celebrate their shared appreciation for high-performance vehicles, showcasing the one-of-a-kind collections and builds that spotlight the community’s dedication to Aussie muscle.


SUMMERNATS sets the stage to showcase some of the nation’s most talented modifiers and their iconic project builds, the survey also found that over 22 percent of enthusiasts car owners have taken on their own car modification projects.


Darrell Leemhuis, former Summernats Grand Champion, said: "As a past Summernats Grand Champion, my connection to this event isn't just about cars. It's a place where not only my cars fit in, but where I fit in too. It's a place where creativity is only limited by the imagination. My 1990 Holden Rodeo, in which I secured the Grand Champion title, is a testament to my love and time invested in the modification of my car.


“Having Australia’s biggest car show in my hometown showcasing just about every category of modified cars including street machines, hot rods, classics, rat rods and muscle cars – just to name a few, makes it the perfect place to connect with fellow enthusiasts, and is a celebration of our shared passion for all things cars."


Data from eBay also reveals that like SUMMERNATS, eBay is a hub for fans to connect and fuel their passion for muscle cars. On ebay.com.au:


●      Some of the most expensive Aussie muscle cars ever sold include a Ford XY GT Falcon for $120,000 and a 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS396 for $99,000

●      “Holden Commodore” is searched for over 13,000 times per month

●      “Holden Monaro” is searched for over 7,500 times per month

●      “Ford Falcon” is searched for over 10,000 times per month

●      “Ford Mustang” is searched for just over 4,500 times per month

           

eBay Australia’s Parts and Accessories Lead,  Kyle Morgan, said: “eBay is the heartland of things people are passionate about: On eBay Australia, “collector car” is searched for once per minute, underscoring the nation’s love affair for car collecting.


“We see the love for cars runs deep with Aussies committed to investing in fueling their passion, with some collectible Aussie muscle cars selling for over $100,000 on eBay Australia.


“We’re thrilled to be sponsoring Summernats, the mecca of the muscle car community. It’s a playground for Australia’s motoring enthusiasts to share their unbridled love for cars. Beyond a marketplace where people come to buy car parts and accessories for their beloved cars, eBay is a place to connect over an appreciation for all things automotive.”


The eBay Garage at Summernats


To celebrate the vibrant community of Aussie muscle fans, SUMMERNATS attendees can look forward to the eBay Garage, which will feature throughout the festival in Canberra from 4-7 January 2024. Aussies will enjoy a chillout zone and front-row seat to the Summernats action, with the destination decked out with Aussie muscle cars, a nostalgic wall of fame heroing the history of Summernats, a racing simulation competition, as well as former Grand Champion Darrell Leemhuis in attendance.


About eBay

eBay Inc. (Nasdaq: EBAY) is a global commerce leader that connects millions of buyers and sellers in more than 190 markets around the world. We exist to enable economic opportunity for individuals, entrepreneurs, businesses and organisations of all sizes. Founded in 1995 in San Jose, California, eBay is one of the world's largest and most vibrant marketplaces for discovering great value and unique selection. In 2022, eBay enabled nearly $74 billion of gross merchandise volume. For more information about the company and its global portfolio of online brands, visit www.ebayinc.com.


References

Pure Profile research commissioned by eBay Australia surveying 1,004 Australians 18+. November 2023.

eBay Australia data sold listings 2009 and 2010.

eBay Australia data October 2022 - September 2023


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